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We had the signs for taking off,
the two of us, we were on top
I had never any doubt
that you'd be there when things got rough.
We had the stuff to do it right
as long as you were by my side,
we were special, we were whole
from the GUT down to the TOE.
But all the harmony was wearing off,
it was too much.
We were living in a fiction
without any imperfection.
Every symmetry
has to be broken,
every harmony
has to decay.
Leave me alone, I'm
tired of talking
I'm not a toy
Leave me alone now
I'm not a token
I'm not a toy
Leave me alone, I'm
tired of talking
I'm not a toy
Leave me alone now
I'm not a token
I'm not a toy
I'm not a toy.
(we had the signs for taking off)
(harmony was wearing off)
(we had the signs for taking off)
(tired of talking)
(harmony was wearing off)
I'm tired of talking.
Every symmetry
has to be broken,
every harmony
has to decay.
Leave me alone, I'm
tired of talking
I'm not a toy
Leave me alone now
I'm not a token
I'm not a toy
Leave me alone, I'm
tired of talking,
I'm not a toy
Leave me alone now
I'm not a token,
I'm not a toy,
I'm not a toy
Every particle has an antiparticle
which is identical to the particle but with opposite electric charge.
If the two meet,
they destroy each other and leave behind a flash of light.
Pairs of particles and antiparticles
- like electrons an positrons -
are all around us.
They are constantly created out of vacuum fluctuations
but immediately destroy each other again,
leaving behind no net energy.
If we invest sufficient energy
we can tear apart the virtual pair of particles and create a pair of real particles
that can trigger a detector.
But the virtual particle pairs have consequences even if they do not become real.
They do, for example, lead to a polarization of the vacuum around an atomic nucleus.
This causes a shift in the energy levels of electrons
which can be observed.
I know it seems strange, but the vacuum around us is never really empty.
It is always full of virtual particle pairs.
For reasons nobody knows, there is almost no antimatter in our universe.
We can create it,
if we collide particles at sufficiently high energies
so that a particle-antiparticle pair can be created.
That's how we know that antimatter exists.
But why there is almost no antimatter around us, nobody knows.
It's one of the big unsolved problems in theoretical physics.
According to the theories of modern particle physics,
matter and antimatter could be exchanged for each other and it wouldn't make any difference.
But because we see so little antimatter around us,
the symmetry between the two must have been broken,
most likely in the early universe.
Matter and antimatter, so we think,
was not created in exactly equal amounts.
Most of it annihilated,
but a little was left over.
It's this little left-over
that you and I and everything we see is made of.