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[MUSIC PLAYING]
SUBJECT 1: Two-double-oh-one has definitely helped me build
confidence in myself as an engineer.
DR. SIMONA SOCRATE: Understanding
how structures perform and fail is
critical for all disciplines in mechanical engineering.
JOSHUA MALDONADO: It really is a gateway
that opens your mind and your heart up the rest of MechE.
TALIA SPITZ: Simona does a really good job
of taking all the concepts she's lecturing on
and giving you something in real life to apply them to.
DR. SIMONA SOCRATE: The equation tells
you what are the relationships, but your life experience
tells you, why are those relationships important?
And now we'll consider--
SUBJECT 2: Simona brings all these practical tools
that she uses to demonstrate a lot of intuition she
wants us to have.
OMORUYI ATEKHA: When she tries to connect it back to something
I've seen my ability to catch on is so much better.
DR. SIMONA SOCRATE: When I see this understanding
and this passion in my own students,
that's the best moment.
When the Discovery Lab, we try to recreate
the moment of discovery, the moment of understanding.
ELY SACHS: The students are actually explicitly told
that they are the first human beings
to discover this knowledge, or that's the mindset.
We have a guided discovery on torsion, another one on beams,
one that looks at a rubber sample being pulled uni-axially
to understand the relationships between displacement,
elongation, and strength.
SUBJECT 3: The labs do a good job
of letting you change variables, move things around,
and seeing the results right in front of you.
ELY SACHS: s used to trying and failing
is incredibly important.
We structure the labs to support this idea
because only if you're willing to fail can
you do something great.
SUBJECT 4: Oh, I see
ELY SACHS: And by the way, we tell them
that they should have fun.
DR. SIMONA SOCRATE: Having fun as you learn
is an important component of learning.
And I think that there are some fun
parts of structural mechanics.
Maybe I'm the only one that sees the fun in all this.
But sometimes the students do as well.
SUBJECT 5: I've laughed more in an engineering class
than I have with Simona.
SUBJECT 6: Two-double-oh-one goes through a lot of content
in probably a rather short amount of time.
JOSHUA MALDONADO: We work hard here.
There's no question about that, and it can be a grind at times.
But the excitement when you create something for the first
time, when you grasp a concept that was inconceivable to you
before, classes like two-double-oh-one really
reinstill that inspiration.
DR. SIMONA SOCRATE: OK?
JOSHUA MALDONADO: I also would say that the staff really
care about our lives.
SUBJECT 6: The staff in two-double-oh-one are extremely
supportive and want to see you understanding the content
and building your confidence.
You won't be floundering.
DR. SIMONA SOCRATE: So we really care about the students.
They know that.
They know that we care about their learning.
They know that we care about them as human beings,
so we have a special relationship with the students
in two-double-oh-one.
ELY SACHS: I'm not just interested in giving
the students a concept.
I'm interested in teaching them how
to think, how to create knowledge,
how to go forward and be creative human contributor.
[INTERPOSING VOICES]
JOSHUA MALDONADO: I can leave this class
prepared to change the world.
[MUSIC PLAYING]